A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health


I was asked by @@WeMHnurses to get involved in hosting a Twitter Chat about CPA. I agreed (with a fair bit of persuasion as I am quite new to Twitter).  You can read the blurb here or read on for a bit of background to inform the Twitter Chat; please do join in, it’s on Monday 10th March at 8pm.

Care Programme Approach (CPA) has been around since 1990 and is an umbrella term to describe the way that a person’s care, support and treatment are arranged in secondary/specialist mental health services through: 

  1. Assessment
  2. Coordination
  3. Care planning
  4. Review

Who should be ‘on CPA’?

Refocusing the Care Programme Approach – policy and positive practice guidance (DH 2008) sought to provide clearer guidance on the characteristics of those needing the support of the CPA framework (see p.13).

In addition, individuals within the following groups should be supported by CPA unless their assessment shows otherwise:

•  Individuals who have parenting responsibilities

•  Individuals who have significant caring responsibilities

•  Individuals with a dual diagnosis (substance use)

•  Individuals with a history of violence or self harm

•  Individuals who are in unsettled accommodation

Some people don’t need CPA but they should still have a care plan (can be a letter), a named lead professional and a review.

To summarise, the CPA framework in place; it considers those that do and those that don’t need CPA; it’s not new; it aligns with the way that different professions work (eg. nursing process); the value base is linked to the Ten Essential Shared Capabilities (2005).

So why, over 20 years later, do I wonder “are we there yet?”

The constantly changing mental health landscape necessitates us to reflect upon what we are doing and to ‘check’ that everything still fits. For example, the introduction of integrated care pathways (ICP’s) –  does this fit with a person centred, co-produced care plan? So the ‘are we there yet?’ question continues to arise but the reality is that the destination is not within our grasp, we get ‘rerouted’ when we think our destination is near. But this is ok; in our professional lives the constant is change. Here are some of the ‘reroutes’ to ponder in relation to planning care: 

•  CPA is linked in with performance reporting with Monitor and Mental Health Minimum Data Set informatics requirement and is included in the National Service User Survey ; results/reports from these tell us that there is a disconnect between the information that organisations hold and what people that access the services tell us about their experiences. How can these differences be explained? Do people who use services and carers/supporters know about CPA? Does it make any difference?

•  Personalisation and Recovery/Wellbeing are approaches that are prominent in mental health. How do these approaches work alongside CPA? Are we finding any conflicts and if so, how are we working through these?

•  How do we ensure that the person is at the centre of their care, support and treatment and that care plans are co-produced?

•  And of course, the question of austerity – how have the NHS cost savings impacted on how we provide CPA? How are mental health professionals maintaining quality?

Share your views/experience

There is a digital conversation guest hosted by @donnajkemp planned for Monday 10th March at 8pm on Twitter to discuss these points; do join us at #WeMHNs;  alternatively post your comments on here.

Click here for more info about the ‘Twitter Chat’ and for links on how to use Twitter

@WeMHnurses is part of the @WeNurses community and is curated by @mrsgracepoole and @NatalieMHN

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Comments on: "CPA – are we there yet?" (2)

  1. I really enjoyed the chat and there was lots of good feedback. I think the overarching theme that I go from it was that people really valued the relationship with the CC and that this was quite central to well- being – not surprisingly.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, there was a lot of good feedback; I particulrly liked that someone said their care coordinater was ‘pretty darn awesome!’. We should keep sight of this 🙂

      Like

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