A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health

Posts tagged ‘carers’

New Mental Health Recovery Group

Here, Elaine Wilkes, Carers Education Worker writes about a new group to support people in Leeds:

I am really excited this morning along with my colleague Lokhi Roy!  We both work as part of Leeds Carers and stated a new group last night based on Mental Health Recovery!

recovery header

The group runs at Vale Circles once every two weeks from 5.30pm-7pm.  It is based on a group that has been running at Lovell Park for five years. Click here for the dates and venue details.

So why the excitement?  Well I experience depression and this is a group where anyone can come along if they have an interest in mental recovery.  This is:

  • Workers
  • People who have mental health problems
  • Carers
  • Anyone who is a combination of all the above

The group focuses on:

  • Hope that recovery can happen
  • Looking at things in a positive way
  • Knowing we experience negative things but looking at the type of things we do to overcome these

My dad died last March and I went to the Lovell Park  group  the week after his funeral.  I was ok but still at times tearful.  A member of the group mentioned railways (which my Dad loved) and I could feel myself becoming tearful.  I did not feel the need to hide the tears but talked about being upset by his death.  This led to other people talking about how they had overcome difficult things including deaths of people close to them.  I went away from that group feeling supported and more positive.  We also talked about techniques that can help all us cope at tough times

My hope for the Vale Circles Recovery Group is that we can develop a safe place where anyone feels comfortable to talk about things that are emotional and hard.  For me the key thing is we don’t stop there but focus on hope, how we can overcome pain and techniques to help all us of do this.

I don’t think it matters whether someone is a service user, carer or worker or all of these.  What matters to me is that we are people  and we all have things that are hard.  This group is about overcoming these things but also have fun and humour along the way.

If you would like further information about these sessions or to book yourself a place please contact 0113 85 54445 and ask for Elaine Wilkes or Lokhi Roy.

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Mediaclip for staff training – participants wanted

Do you currently receive community services from LYPFT, or have in the last 12 months? Are you a carer of someone accessing LYPFT community services?

If so, and your care is arranged through Care Programme Approach, by sharing your story and experiences digitally you can help improve services through helping us understand what we do well, and where we can improve. Your experience would be used for staff training and for general mental health and carer awareness across the Trust and with the general public.video1-

Areas to understand include: assessment; care coordination; care planning; review; working with others including carers. Also your understanding of recovery and wellbeing.

Digital recording will be on the 17th and 20th of November, it will take no longer than two hours. If you would like to participate or would like more information then please contact Donna Kemp donna.kemp@nhs.net 07985259082

Thank you!inkwell nov

 

What are your top 3 messages for people planning your care?

What are your top 3 ‘makes a difference’ messages you would give to the people planning and providing your care, support and treatment?

I am keen to include the ‘individuals’ voice’ in training. Why? Because what’s the point in providing training if it doesn’t make a difference to the people accessing services. Training can become a standards checklist unless it relates directly to people’s care support and treatment in a meaningful way. The training has to resonate with the participant on some level if it is to have an impact and influence or change practice. The training has to have some value.

listening

In the NHS we are super keen to measure everything, and it’s not that I am against this; it’s just that the measurable bits are often ‘hard’ – concrete and tangible, but it might be that the ‘soft’ bits are where the quality sits. So for example, with Care Programme Approach, one of the standards is that everyone should have a review at least once a year. This is a ‘hard’ standard; it is a distinct event with a time-frame; it is one that is ‘counted’ and reported on. The quality or ‘soft’ aspect in this standard is harder to count but impacts on the persons experience of care support and treatment – the review should include the person’s views, should be held in a way that the person prefers, the review should be held when needed (a year is a long time when you want to be moving forward……) and the review might be a series of discussions and information gathering to inform the care plan rather than a formal, chaired event. It tends to be the ‘hard’ bits that drive practice. My concern here is that practice gets distilled down to the hard bits and the soft bits fall by the wayside. Don’t get me wrong, often it’s the hard bits that get the job done #performance, but is it at the expense of the soft bits #experience? Perhaps a blend of both is best, but have we got the balance right?

So, what are your top 3 ‘makes a difference’ messages you would give to the people planning and providing your care, support and treatment?

New Care Act – key points for mental health

In this post, Jenny Titcombe, Senior Mental Health Social Worker, explains about the new Care Act and what it means for people accessing mental health services, carers and for people working in mental health………

What do people need to know about the new Care Act ?

• The government says the new Care Act (2014) is the biggest social care reform in the UK for over half a century. The Care Act aims to simplify all other laws and tries to make it clear exactly what people who need social care advice/ support can expect from their council.
• The wellbeing of people is at the centre of the new Care Act. Councils now have a duty to think about the physical, mental and emotional wellbeing of people who need care. Councils also have a new duty to provide preventative services to keep people healthy in the first place. Council’s must also provide better information to help people access good care.
• For the first time the care system will be built around each individual person and what care they each need and want. Personal Budget’s are part of the new law which give people the power to spend allocated money on care that meets their needs and suits them best.
• The Care Act also introduces a cap on care costs for which an individual is liable (April, 2016)

More information is available here

What does The Care Act mean for carers?

• The Care Act also introduces new rights for carers. Now anyone who provides unpaid care or support to an adult family member or friend can arrange to have a carer’s assessment, irrespective of whether the person they care for has eligible needs. Previously only carers providing regular and substantial care were entitled to a carer’s assessment.
• For the first time, if a Carer has eligible needs of their own, they will have the right to support from the council.
More information is available at Carers UK herehere is a link to Carers Leeds and this link is to York Carers Forum.

What does this mean for people working in mental health?
• Social workers in Community Mental Health Teams have recently undergone training in The Care Act and have embraced changes to practice, process and paperwork.
• As a result of The Care Act, working age adults with mental health problems and professional referrers should find it easier to access funded support as assessments are based on an individual’s needs (rather than available services) and more flexible responses to meeting eligible needs should be available.
• The Care Act now makes integration, cooperation and partnership a legal requirement on local authorities and on all agencies involved in public care the NHS including independent or private sector organisations and housing. Those working in Mental Health Services should expect further moves towards integrated services over the coming years.
• The Care Act makes offering Personal Budgets to people with eligible social care need law. Although under separate legislation – there is likely to be a rise in personal health budgets and mixed (health and social care) budgets over coming years. Recently introduced regulations now makes it law that those eligible for NHS Continuing Health Care have a right to a Personal Health Budget.
Watch this space …

Jenny Titcombe
Senior Mental Health Social Worker

Service User Experience of CPA Reviews – final report

People receiving care, support and treatment from Leeds and York Partnerships Foundation Trust (LYPFT) should have a care plan and this should be reviewed regularly. Care may be arranged through ‘Care Programme Approach (CPA)’  or through ‘Standard Care Plan’ if needs are more straightforward.

LYPFT sent out a brief questionnaire to people on CPA to find out what their experience of their review was; you can read a bit more about the questionnaire here.

The results from the questionnaire, the full report can be found here:final report

  • People being offered or given a copy of their care plan was 54.5%.
  • Understanding what is in the care plan, being involved in agreeing the goals and being aware that other people could be involved in the review are areas identified for improvement.
  • Areas where the results should be celebrated are that people are aware of who their care coordinator is, that they were asked how they were feeling, that they had their say and that they found the review overall helpful.
  • Results from 2013 to 2014 are overall improving.
  •  The response rate to the questionnaire was lower than anticipated at just over 7%.

In response to the questionnaire results LYPFT are focusing training on improving service user involvement in planning care. There are monthly awareness sessions across Leeds and York – dates for these are available here; they are open to people accessing services and carers as well as members of staff across LYPFT and partner organisations. The Planning Care Workplan Implementation Group are tasked with overseeing LYPFT activity in relation to planning care – you can find out more about this group here.

Many thanks to those of you who participated in completing the questionnaires.

Donna Kemp | CPA Development Manager

 

Planning Care Checklist

Planning Care Checklist

Join the conversation here.

Accessing services from Aire Court in South Leeds? tell us about it……..

SSE convo poster

 

Can’t make it to the event?

You are welcome to share your comments here or by email to donna.kemp@nhs.net

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