A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health

Posts tagged ‘carers’

New Mental Health Recovery Group

Here, Elaine Wilkes, Carers Education Worker writes about a new group to support people in Leeds:

I am really excited this morning along with my colleague Lokhi Roy!  We both work as part of Leeds Carers and stated a new group last night based on Mental Health Recovery!

recovery header

The group runs at Vale Circles once every two weeks from 5.30pm-7pm.  It is based on a group that has been running at Lovell Park for five years. Click here for the dates and venue details.

So why the excitement?  Well I experience depression and this is a group where anyone can come along if they have an interest in mental recovery.  This is:

  • Workers
  • People who have mental health problems
  • Carers
  • Anyone who is a combination of all the above

The group focuses on:

  • Hope that recovery can happen
  • Looking at things in a positive way
  • Knowing we experience negative things but looking at the type of things we do to overcome these

My dad died last March and I went to the Lovell Park  group  the week after his funeral.  I was ok but still at times tearful.  A member of the group mentioned railways (which my Dad loved) and I could feel myself becoming tearful.  I did not feel the need to hide the tears but talked about being upset by his death.  This led to other people talking about how they had overcome difficult things including deaths of people close to them.  I went away from that group feeling supported and more positive.  We also talked about techniques that can help all us cope at tough times

My hope for the Vale Circles Recovery Group is that we can develop a safe place where anyone feels comfortable to talk about things that are emotional and hard.  For me the key thing is we don’t stop there but focus on hope, how we can overcome pain and techniques to help all us of do this.

I don’t think it matters whether someone is a service user, carer or worker or all of these.  What matters to me is that we are people  and we all have things that are hard.  This group is about overcoming these things but also have fun and humour along the way.

If you would like further information about these sessions or to book yourself a place please contact 0113 85 54445 and ask for Elaine Wilkes or Lokhi Roy.

Mediaclip for staff training – participants wanted

Do you currently receive community services from LYPFT, or have in the last 12 months? Are you a carer of someone accessing LYPFT community services?

If so, and your care is arranged through Care Programme Approach, by sharing your story and experiences digitally you can help improve services through helping us understand what we do well, and where we can improve. Your experience would be used for staff training and for general mental health and carer awareness across the Trust and with the general public.video1-

Areas to understand include: assessment; care coordination; care planning; review; working with others including carers. Also your understanding of recovery and wellbeing.

Digital recording will be on the 17th and 20th of November, it will take no longer than two hours. If you would like to participate or would like more information then please contact Donna Kemp donna.kemp@nhs.net 07985259082

Thank you!inkwell nov

 

What are your top 3 messages for people planning your care?

What are your top 3 ‘makes a difference’ messages you would give to the people planning and providing your care, support and treatment?

I am keen to include the ‘individuals’ voice’ in training. Why? Because what’s the point in providing training if it doesn’t make a difference to the people accessing services. Training can become a standards checklist unless it relates directly to people’s care support and treatment in a meaningful way. The training has to resonate with the participant on some level if it is to have an impact and influence or change practice. The training has to have some value.

listening

In the NHS we are super keen to measure everything, and it’s not that I am against this; it’s just that the measurable bits are often ‘hard’ – concrete and tangible, but it might be that the ‘soft’ bits are where the quality sits. So for example, with Care Programme Approach, one of the standards is that everyone should have a review at least once a year. This is a ‘hard’ standard; it is a distinct event with a time-frame; it is one that is ‘counted’ and reported on. The quality or ‘soft’ aspect in this standard is harder to count but impacts on the persons experience of care support and treatment – the review should include the person’s views, should be held in a way that the person prefers, the review should be held when needed (a year is a long time when you want to be moving forward……) and the review might be a series of discussions and information gathering to inform the care plan rather than a formal, chaired event. It tends to be the ‘hard’ bits that drive practice. My concern here is that practice gets distilled down to the hard bits and the soft bits fall by the wayside. Don’t get me wrong, often it’s the hard bits that get the job done #performance, but is it at the expense of the soft bits #experience? Perhaps a blend of both is best, but have we got the balance right?

So, what are your top 3 ‘makes a difference’ messages you would give to the people planning and providing your care, support and treatment?

New Care Act – key points for mental health

In this post, Jenny Titcombe, Senior Mental Health Social Worker, explains about the new Care Act and what it means for people accessing mental health services, carers and for people working in mental health………

What do people need to know about the new Care Act ?

• The government says the new Care Act (2014) is the biggest social care reform in the UK for over half a century. The Care Act aims to simplify all other laws and tries to make it clear exactly what people who need social care advice/ support can expect from their council.
• The wellbeing of people is at the centre of the new Care Act. Councils now have a duty to think about the physical, mental and emotional wellbeing of people who need care. Councils also have a new duty to provide preventative services to keep people healthy in the first place. Council’s must also provide better information to help people access good care.
• For the first time the care system will be built around each individual person and what care they each need and want. Personal Budget’s are part of the new law which give people the power to spend allocated money on care that meets their needs and suits them best.
• The Care Act also introduces a cap on care costs for which an individual is liable (April, 2016)

More information is available here

What does The Care Act mean for carers?

• The Care Act also introduces new rights for carers. Now anyone who provides unpaid care or support to an adult family member or friend can arrange to have a carer’s assessment, irrespective of whether the person they care for has eligible needs. Previously only carers providing regular and substantial care were entitled to a carer’s assessment.
• For the first time, if a Carer has eligible needs of their own, they will have the right to support from the council.
More information is available at Carers UK herehere is a link to Carers Leeds and this link is to York Carers Forum.

What does this mean for people working in mental health?
• Social workers in Community Mental Health Teams have recently undergone training in The Care Act and have embraced changes to practice, process and paperwork.
• As a result of The Care Act, working age adults with mental health problems and professional referrers should find it easier to access funded support as assessments are based on an individual’s needs (rather than available services) and more flexible responses to meeting eligible needs should be available.
• The Care Act now makes integration, cooperation and partnership a legal requirement on local authorities and on all agencies involved in public care the NHS including independent or private sector organisations and housing. Those working in Mental Health Services should expect further moves towards integrated services over the coming years.
• The Care Act makes offering Personal Budgets to people with eligible social care need law. Although under separate legislation – there is likely to be a rise in personal health budgets and mixed (health and social care) budgets over coming years. Recently introduced regulations now makes it law that those eligible for NHS Continuing Health Care have a right to a Personal Health Budget.
Watch this space …

Jenny Titcombe
Senior Mental Health Social Worker

Service User Experience of CPA Reviews – final report

People receiving care, support and treatment from Leeds and York Partnerships Foundation Trust (LYPFT) should have a care plan and this should be reviewed regularly. Care may be arranged through ‘Care Programme Approach (CPA)’  or through ‘Standard Care Plan’ if needs are more straightforward.

LYPFT sent out a brief questionnaire to people on CPA to find out what their experience of their review was; you can read a bit more about the questionnaire here.

The results from the questionnaire, the full report can be found here:final report

  • People being offered or given a copy of their care plan was 54.5%.
  • Understanding what is in the care plan, being involved in agreeing the goals and being aware that other people could be involved in the review are areas identified for improvement.
  • Areas where the results should be celebrated are that people are aware of who their care coordinator is, that they were asked how they were feeling, that they had their say and that they found the review overall helpful.
  • Results from 2013 to 2014 are overall improving.
  •  The response rate to the questionnaire was lower than anticipated at just over 7%.

In response to the questionnaire results LYPFT are focusing training on improving service user involvement in planning care. There are monthly awareness sessions across Leeds and York – dates for these are available here; they are open to people accessing services and carers as well as members of staff across LYPFT and partner organisations. The Planning Care Workplan Implementation Group are tasked with overseeing LYPFT activity in relation to planning care – you can find out more about this group here.

Many thanks to those of you who participated in completing the questionnaires.

Donna Kemp | CPA Development Manager

 

Planning Care Checklist

Planning Care Checklist

Join the conversation here.

Accessing services from Aire Court in South Leeds? tell us about it……..

SSE convo poster

 

Can’t make it to the event?

You are welcome to share your comments here or by email to donna.kemp@nhs.net

Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat – have your say in Leeds

crisis care concordat

Information for people accessing services and carers about CPA


cpa-logo

Care Programme Approach (CPA) is the term used to describe the way that a person’s care, support and treatment is arranged when they have a range of needs.  This is done through assessment, coordination, care planning and review.  Some people will have straightforward needs; their care, support and treatment are described as ‘Standard Care Plan’.  You can read our policy: The Trust Wide Care Programme Approach Policy (including arrangements for Standard Care Plan) here.

Information for people accessing services and carers about CPA

1735_DSC_0245_scrabble_recoveryThe single most important thing about CPA is that you should be at the centre; it’s about you; it’s about what you want to do with your life; about what you want to achieve and how you want to achieve it. This may involve support, care and treatment from others – people that support you, carers, your friends, family, it may also include mental health services, health services, social care, and other organisations near where you live. Some people also get support from others going through similar difficulties – this is often called ‘Peer Support’. You can access peer support in a number of ways, for example, Mind, local groups or online support.

 

There are four stages to CPA:-

1. Assessment
You will be asked questions about aspects of your life and past, for example: personal; health; social;  about your safety (this is sometimes called risk); about what you enjoy doing; about what you do to help manage; about anyone else all ready involved in your care and support, including any carer. Carers can have their own assessment.

 2. Care Coordination

A care coordinator will be named to work closely with you and your carer to arrange care and support and to work with you to agree goals.
3. Care Plan
This describes your health and social care goals.  The care plan says which services will help with recovery and wellbeing; and what you do to help too.

The care plan is about you. It is developed with you and includes your goals; what support is being offered; who is giving the support and when the support will be reviewed.  The carer will be included too if you want this.

You may write the care plan yourself, or write it with your co-ordinator, either way, you should have a copy of your care plan.

4. Review
These are sometimes called CPA meetings; they happen at least every 12 months but can be more often. This is where the care plan is reviewed.  This is done by discussing with you, your carer (with agreement) and any others involved in your care plan about what is working well and what may need to be changed to support your recovery and wellbeing. The review is usually held in a way that you prefer – for example, some people prefer more of a relaxed discussion with their co-ordinator, others prefer a full meeting with everyone involved present.

Have you recently had a review? If so, let us know how this was for you by completing a brief survey (12 questions) – click here for more information and the survey. Results tell us what we are doing well and where we need to improve.


Standard Care Plan

If you have straightforward needs and are seen by one mental health worker then your care, support and treatment is described as ‘Standard Care Plan’.

You can expect:

  • A lead professional identified – this will be the person that you see
  • A letter – this is the care plan
  • Review – this is a chance to talk about how things are going and any further care plan agreed.

More written information

Click here for an information leaflet about CPA

Click here to read an information booklet on CPA – for people in Leeds

Click here to read an information booklet on CPA – for people in York and North York

These booklets are also available in Urdu, Farsi, Czech and Polish – contact donna.kemp@nhs.net for these.

Want to get involved and keep up to date about what’s going on?

blog title jpegThe LYPFT Planning Care Network is a digital space for people who access services, carers/supporters, staff and partner agencies to share their ideas and experiences around care coordination and care planning.  Click here to visit the network; you are most welcome to post comments and to share your views and experience. If you want to write your own blog post, then contact donna.kemp@nhs.net to discuss.

SUN logoYou can also join the Service User Network – they meet monthly in a range of venues across Leeds; click here for more information.

 

If you require any further information regarding CPA or Standard Care Plan then please contact donna.kemp@nhs.net

Listening to children – a role for mental health professionals

Here, Lindsay Britton introduces her role and outlines some of the key issues for mental health professionals in working with families and keeping children safe:

I would like to introduce myself, my name is Lindsay Britton and I am the Named Nurse for Safeguarding Children and Domestic Violence lead for Leeds and York Partnerships NHS Foundation Trust. My role includes being involved with serious case reviews and learning lessons reviews where children have been seriously harmed or died,  and domestic homicide reviews where adults have been killed due to domestic violence.  I attend the MARAC (multiagency risk assessment conference) for adults in high risk domestic abuse situations and we share information on our involvement and plan strategies to ensure their safety. I also ensure all staff are trained and provide advice and supervision.

Increasingly we are recognising the impact that adult mental health difficulties, substance misuse, learning disability or domestic violence can have on children in the family and I feel it is important to ensure the right support is in place to ensure the child’s needs are met. I think the emotional impact is very significant and the fact that many are young carers for their parent. I also believe that parents/carers can have these difficulties and still look after  their children excellently, but it is about having the right support at the right time, and this being recognised.

For our staff there is an increasing demand for them to engage with the children in the family and work with other agencies to assess and ensure the child’s needs are being met. This can be daunting for those only used to working with adults and we are working on improving our training to better equip staff.  This is not something we can get away from as it is not only very important that we ALL think about the child or adult at potential risk  but we are inspected on our engagement with children and joint working by both OFSTED and the Care Quality Commission.  Our senior staff who provide supervision need to ensure their supervisee’s are reflecting on their practice around their work with children and families.

As a parent accessing mental health services, what does this mean to you?

As a clinician, how might this influence your current practice?

What support do you need to be able to deliver this?

How can we all make sure we ‘hear’ what young people are telling us?

Here are some links that may be of interest in relation to parental mental health:

Mental Health Foundation – Parents

SCIE – Think child, think parent, think family: a guide to parental mental health and child welfare

Ofsted –What about the children? Joint working between adult and children’s services when parents or carers have mental ill health and/or alcohol problems

Talking to your child about mental health – Time to Change

Working Together 2013

Parents as Patients

Silent Voices

LYPFT Trust Wide Care Programme Approach Policy

The Trust Wide Care Programme Approach Policy (including arrangements for Standard Care Plan) has now been published at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust following a review of the outgoing CPA Policy; it identifies best practice as outlined by the Department of Health, Nice Guidance and the various frameworks supporting practice. There was consultation across Leeds and York – clinical groups, service user and carer groups, social care and partner agencies.

Of note, the following are included within the policy:

  • The term ‘Standard Care Plan’ will be used to describe the arrangements for people not on CPA (this replaces the term ‘care plan’)
  • Involving people in developing their Care Plan and writing the care plan in a way to reflect this
  • The person (and their carer if agreed) should be provided with a copy of their Care Plan
  • Agreeing with the individual the best way to arrange their ‘Review’ – CPA or Standard Care Plan
  • Guidelines for Section 117 Aftercare including template for discharge or transfer – these have been agreed across the local authorities in Leeds, York and North Yorkshire

You can find a copy of The Trust Wide Care Programme Approach Policy (including arrangements for Standard Care Plan)  here.

The policy will be reviewed again in 2016, work on that will start in the next 9 -12 months. In the meantime, please feel free to leave your comments or feedback, they will be considered in the review. Nearer the time, I will be asking for people to express interest in getting involved with the review……..

Donna Kemp | CPA Development Manager | donna.kemp@nhs.net

 

 

 

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Pathways to Recovery: Service User & Carer led research, a carers view

Service User Led Research ‘Is there a pathway to recovery through care coordination?’ was presented at a recent CPAA event  – click here to read more about this event. This emancipatory research was designed and conducted by people with lived experience of mental health difficulties and carers.

This research supports recovery in a number of ways – for example, personal recovery and wellbeing; hope, inspiration and aspiration for others; contributing to the evidence base for recovery. This is a positive story that should be shared…… Caroline Kemp (no relation 🙂 ) agreed to write about her experience as a carer & researcher; and shares a poem about coding…….

Pathways to Recovery..how and why I got involved..

The last few years have been very rewarding for me…the path has been very stimulating and has been a big learning curve.

My background has been in mental health as I have cared for my daughter for over 16 years. She has enduring and severe mental health problems..her path has been very tough and witnessing this battle is also equally as tough..too much anxiety and panic. .and also the fact that no meds seemed to be of any help..just lots of dreadful side effects…as a mum and a Carer you expect or try to fix things..I always thought things would be better if only we could find the right meds…I tried to read as much as I could so I could help..I thought in the early days I would fix it..and my daughter would not suffer needlessly for years…

When I first heard of the research into pathways to recovery through care coordination I felt strongly I wanted to be a part in it..( I had had plenty of experience of Care Coordination..not all positive ) The reasons were mixed..on one hand they were purely selfish..if there was any hope of finding recovery I had to know it.. I wanted to have some hope…the other reason was to make things better for everyone in anguish and torment..I think this is also why people do research in the first place..to make things better.. I had seen too many people abandoned on the acute wards without a single visitor.  Also our research group were chosen because of their expertise and life experience..there was no formal academic requirement..another strength was we were a mix of service users, Carers and professionals.  We had multiple perspectives and this made out research even better science. Also I knew from the way this research was done we would play a full part in doing it..at all levels ..it would not be a tick box exercise.

C Kemp poem

At Northumbria we were given excellent training on research up to PhD level ..so this gave our group the confidence to do all the interviews..Carers  interviewing Carers and S U interviewing S U…in all the interviews this has made a difference to our data as people related to us and disclosed more of their true feelings..perhaps this was because we had shared journeys and paths. We developed questionnaires, piloted them, and refined them.

After hearing all these stories I cannot help being amazed at human resilience in the face of terrible tough times and challenges..

Not only did we interview but we also did data analysis ..I never thought I would be able to do this but after all our training I had the confidence to sign up for it..it certainly sharpened our interviewing skills and kept us on task on answering the research project question..not just collecting hours of data. I also learned a whole new vocabulary …Nvivo and nodes…parent ones too..

I have been part of this research for over three years now and I have had many highlights..

What I loved was meeting every Wednesday and analysing the data; keeping a reflective diary and writing poems around recovery..I have been published in an American journal; doing many Carer interviews and sharing people’s life stories; being asked to present at conferences, INVOLVE and to the Trust; talking to students at Northumbria on our research; I also did a short video diary for NIHR ( National Institute of Health Research ) this has been used to train students too; and have been interviewed twice on the radio! At the INVOLVE conference our group was selected to be in a film also. It has been very exciting. We have been brave enough to step outside of our comfort zone.. And it has been well worth it. It has been part of our recovery too..that is being engaged in something meaningful and the added bonus of being for the benefit of others.

Caroline kemp

Presenting at St James

At the moment we are preparing our next three conferences on the findings to the trust and developing a toolkit. Also we have been asked to write about our journey and how we did it..not only academic papers but also a book..so we have a lot to do.

But this is how I like it and I think I speak for others in the group too..we will be sad when it ends..however I think when you do become involved it always leads to many other things..jobs for some, enhanced skills..now we are a trained group of researchers and can offer our own training and experience to others…

I am glad I have been valued as a Carer and service users in the group are also glad that their mental health experiences have been recognised and valued and able to be of benefit to others on the pathway to recovery.

It gave me hope things could be different and I would encourage everyone to become involved in research ..you do not have to have a degree..just valuable life experience. And empathy ..and a willingness to work and share together and learn from each other. It was great being part of a team.

Caroline Kemp

Carers Resource Folder – feedback request

Hi, my name is Steve Taylor and I manage of the carers team in Leeds at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.

I am in the process of developing a ‘Carers Resource Folder’ and am keen to get your views and feedback on it.

The folder comprises of a series of fact Sheets that carers can pick up as they go through their own  ‘journey’ of mental health services.carers resource pack

There will be a core number of sheet (information that is relevant) to all Mental Health carers and others that are service specific.

By introducing the information as a series of ‘fact sheets’ means that it keeps cost low and information would be able to be updated easier.

Click here to view the Resource Pack 

All ‘fact sheets would be available to download or view from LYPFT external website.

Please consider:

  • The overall presentation
  • The wording – is it understandable? is it in plain English?
  • The layout
  • The content – is it enough information, too much?

Can you please post your comments here or feel free to email them to me stephen.taylor3@nhs.net  by 14th April 2014

Many thanks

Steve

 

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Using data to improve care – a participation event

LYPFT Planning Care Network – our first event of 2014!

You are invited to join us in a participation event that brings together service users, carers, health and social care practitioners alongside developers, designers and coders to explore using data to improve care.

Click here for full details of the event and the issues we are hoping to explore.

The event will take place on Friday 11 April 2014 between 10.00 – 16.00.

Time: 10am until 4pm
Location: Arthington House (part of Leeds Federated Housing),
30 Westfield Road, Leeds, LS3 1DE

We will provide lunch and refreshments during the course of the day.

To book your place and let us know if you have any specific requirements please contact Susan Portland by 31 March 2014: Email: s.portland@nhs.net or telephone: 0113 30 55972

Please note: for those eligible, reimbursement of travel expenses will be made on the day (receipt needed). If you have any questions or comments please contact donna.kemp@nhs.net

Care Programme Approach – a national perspective

I was asked by @WeMHnurses to get involved in hosting a Twitter Chat about Care Programme Approach (CPA). I agreed (with a fair bit of persuasion as I am quite new to Twitter) and the chat took place on March 10th.  You can read the Tweets here ; and view the background information here.

twitter

One of the great things about getting involved in discussions on Twitter is the broad range of perspectives that are brought together from across the country in one place, in real-time.  It’s great for provoking thought and an appreciation of views that might be contrary or complementary to your own.  Though a social media platform, Twitter is far more than social, it is a place to ‘meet’ other professionals and experts by experience; often those that you would not usually encounter in your day-to-day working life. Mark Brown talks about ‘Public Professionals’ a unique perspective of how health care professionals connect with the wider community, definitely worth a read (here)  if you ever wondered about the value of participating in social media.

Back to the national perspective contributed at the Twitter Chat; here are some of the key points that came up (and some of my thoughts in italics):

 

  • CPA is an odd name, not very descriptive of what it is. Some folk refer to it as ‘the CPA’ but not clear on what this is referring to – the assessment, the care plan or the review? Perhaps this reflects a lack of understanding or perhaps a culture within the clinical area – does this matter or is it a pedantic point of a CPA geek (me)?
  • Documentation – completion of it seems to be a task ‘ paperwork to be filled in’ rather than a collaboration;  can be a useful tool when used properly.  Need to consider the individual’s experience of how we approach CPA – if we see it as form filling, then that is how it is likely to be perceived. What support do staff need in ‘reframing’ their view of CPA?
  • Variable take up across UK; an effective approach but only when it is implemented properly, difficult with the current fall in resources and increase in demand – all folk receiving ongoing care support or treatment should be either on CPA or ‘Standard Care Plan’
  • People need the right information about CPA; this information is not always available – I am assuming that some organisations are not providing written information for people accessing services, Department of Health did produce some literature, but it is quite a while ago. Is what we have in LYPFT ok?
  • CPA should be aligned closely to recovery/wellbeing/personalisation and not seen as separate; and owned by the person; carers and family should be included.  Fully agree, some very good examples of this in practice, if folk use recovery ‘principles’ in the way they work, then CPA is approached in the same way.

How does this fit with your experience of CPA across Leeds and York? It would be great to hear how CPA is being used in different teams.

 

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