A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health

Posts tagged ‘Leeds’

Spirituality & Recovery Event

Guest post from Bev:

Service User Network meet monthly. It is for people who are or who have accessed LYPFT services within the past 12 months, including carers.

In January 2015 we had Reverend Michael Mkpadi attend to discuss Spirituality and Recovery. We all completed a Compassionate Care survey, to score from a list of values their importance, when people are unwell; here are the top themes:

sun dec 2015Love

Being accepted

Trust

Safety

Compassion

Peace

Patience

Kindness 

The event in January was well attended, over 40  people were there. It was a very inspirational interactive discussion, where all  people shared their own spiritual experiences. Everyone’s feedback was extremely positive and they requested this session should be repeated again. You can read the testimonials here

I wish to advertise  16th December SUN meeting (see poster above) where  we will again be  discussing with Michael Mkpadi Spirituality and Recovery. I hope to see many new faces there. If you wish to find out more information please contact the Chair Bev Thornton, details on the poster.

Thanks

 

Beyond Existing, support group for men & women who have been abused

beyond existingBeyond Existing: Therapeutic Support Groups for Adults Who Have Been Abused (www.beyondexisting.org.uk)

Beyond Existing currently have vacancies in the Women’s Group. The next meeting is this coming Saturday 7th November 2015 between 10.00 and 12.00. We now meet in LEEDS CITY CENTRE, but we can provide/fund transport if someone has a genuine difficulty in getting to the venue.

A new Men’s Group will start in January 2016. Referrals are being taken now; the number of places is limited.

Click here for a leaflet with more information;   to make a referral please ring Jacki Pritchard on 0114 270 1782.

 

 

Research: LYPFT participating in EQUIP project

EQUIP: Enhancing the quality of user involved care planning in mental health services

LYPFT are pleased to be involved in the EQUIP trial, involving service users, carers and clinical teams in research. Here is an outline of the project and what it entails for participants.equip logo

  • The EQUIP project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research’s Programme Grants for Applied Research Programme.
  • A joint project between University of Manchester; Manchester Mental Health and Social Care NHS Trust; University of Nottingham; and Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust.
  • 5 year programme
  • Aim: to develop, evaluate, implement and disseminate a user/carer led training package for mental health professionals to improve user/carer involvement in care planning

Service user and carer participation:

  1. Researchers and Trust clinical studies officers assess eligibility of service users for participation in the trial
  2. Service users are written to, inviting expressions of interest to participate
  3. Face to face informed consent is sought
  4. Service user is asked to identify an involved carer, friend, family member
  5. Care coordinator asked to complete a brief risk assessment
  6. Baseline questionnaire data is gathered prior to team training
  7. Questionnaires are repeated 6 months after team training

Clinical team participation:

  1. There are 3 pairs of community teams identified across Leeds and York
  2. Teams are randomly assigned to control and experiment groups
  3. All Mental Health professionals and Allied Health Professional’s will be asked to participate in the training (80%+ participation required)
  4. The training package – co-produced and co-delivered with users and carers – is delivered over 2 days (October/ November 2015)
  5. Team clinical supervision is offered post training (6 hours)
  6. At the end of the trial, training will also be offered to the control groups

There is opportunity for service users, carers and Mental Health professionals to participate in interviews to explore the impact of the training after the event.

If you have any questions or comments, then please do not hesitate to contact donna.kemp@nhs.net

Additional support at Dial House, Leeds, for people in crisis

Fiona Venner announces extra opening hours for Dial House in Leeds:

I am delighted to inform you that from Wednesday 1st April, thanks to increased NHS funding, Dial House will be open on Wednesday nights from 6pm to 2am as well as Friday to Monday nights.

Dial hse

Dial House is our flagship service, founded in 1999, and continues to provide a place of sanctuary and support to people in acute distress which is an alternative to psychiatric hospitalisation and statutory services.

Our second crisis house, Dial House @ Touchstone, opened in October 2013 to provide crisis support on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6-11pm for people from BME groups, who did not traditionally access Dial House.

From 1st April, we will have a house open every night of the year, which was the vision of our founders, a group of campaigning mental health service users, who worked tirelessly to bring the organisation into existence in the 1990s.

We also have the Connect helpline, open every night of the year from 6-10.30pm and a programme of group work. From April 2015, this will comprise a social and support group, two Lesbian Gay, Bisexual and Transgender groups, a specific Transgender group and a Coping with Crisis group.

If you would like leaflets about any or all of our services, please email michelle.noad@lslcs.org.uk or telephone 0113 260 9328.

 

 

Smoking in NHS Trusts – what’s your view?

Smoking is an emotive subject: health; choice; freedom; rights; collateral cost. Never more so than in the NHS, Trusts are increasingly going Smoke Free. At March’s Service User Network, the topic is ‘Leeds and York Partnerships NHS Foundation Trust’s smoking policy’ – all welcome to join in the discussion, but in the meantime:Sun March 2015

What are your views about people smoking during an inpatient stay? 

What can and should Trusts do to support people to stop smoking?

What about NHS staff smoking?

Click here for the transcript of a WeMHN’sTwitterchat about Mental Health and Smoking.

Exciting Start to 2015 for Recovery Service

It’s been an exciting but fast-paced start to 2015, For those of us in Rehabilitation and Recovery Services over at Asket Croft/House.

As you may remember from our previous post introducing ourselves as the new Recovery Centre partnership team, and outlining the planned changes to R&R services, things had been building here at Asket in the lead up to Christmas, culminating in the big ‘moving week’ from 5th January. On this date, the Millside R&R inpatient unit closed its doors and, with the help of lots of vans and plenty of extra staff on hand, service users were supported in moving to their new homes on either the new Asket Croft ward, or the more independent Asket House ward. The following day, the same happened at the Towngate unit, meaning by Wednesday both the Croft and House were fully operational.

It wasn’t just our service users who were moving though. The closing of Millside and Towngate has also meant that existing inpatient staff who had been working on these units have also moved bases and teams, coming together to get to know their new colleagues and find their feet on new wards – as well as getting to know ourselves in the Recovery Centre team and finding out more about what our role will be alongside working alongside them. It has been a challenging but exciting period of change for all, with lots to work out as the teams with existing ways of working have all merged – whether that’s where to have handover or where to put plates in the kitchens!

road to recoveryAt the Recovery Centre not much changed in our office that week, but there were certainly many memorable afternoons spent putting our moving and handling training to full use, moving LOTS of old boxes, whiteboards, bits of furniture and mini fridges around the site that had arrived direct from Millside and Towngate, supporting the inpatient staff with practical issues to ensure things went as smoothly as possible. Sorting through the boxes was certainly quite a big job as we went through a wealth of old files, service information, CDs, books – even discovering a fetching top hat along the way. It also meant that we were also able to meet service users for the first time and support them in some unpacking which was very valuable, however. At times it may have felt quite overwhelming for all involved, but it was mostly quite exciting to get stuck in and see the move in action!

During the last few weeks since the move, the Recovery Centre team have continued with much of the same work as we had started before Christmas, becoming involved with the Croft and House at a gradual pace to allow the inpatient staff to find their feet in their new teams and develop relationships with service users first and foremost. We have started attending ward rounds, handovers and the service users’ Your Views meeting to introduce ourselves, and have felt welcomed. Some of the care coordinators within our team have even begun new assessments. As with the start of any brand new team – particularly what with the LYPFT and 3rd sector partnership working that we have taking place in our team – there have been practical issues to solve too, for example how will we use PARIS as a team and where will we record our notes? Which care coordinator will supervise which recovery worker? How can the third sector staff ensure they keep strong links with their parent organisations in this partnership? Where exactly do we keep our tea and coffee?

There may have been a few bumps in the road, but we are looking forward to the next few months now things look clearer and as we start to undertake more and more clinical work. We have also been joined by a new Leeds Mind recovery worker this week, James, and will also be joined by another recovery worker from Touchstone in the coming weeks, and this has given us a great opportunity to reflect on the journey of our team so far. Now that the all-important allocations meeting for care coordinators has taken place, it really feels like we can really get going soon.

Now to look to March and beyond…

by Jude Taylor, Recovery Worker

Follow us @leedsmhrecovery

Mental Health focus group for young people in Leeds

Young Minds and Youth Watch are holding an informal focus group for young people aged 13 -25 that have used mental health services in Leeds.

The meeting will take place on Monday 2 February 5-7pm in Leeds City Centre. Travel expenses will be given to all attendees, along with refreshments and a £10 high street voucher.

To find out more please contact Liz Neill elizabeth.neill@youngminds.org.uk 07817 771181 or Harriet Wright harriet@healthwatchleeds.co.uk 07741 294004.

Young people, parents/carers and professionals are also invited to give your views online via a short survey. Surveys close Thursday 29 January 2015.

Service User Networks – January dates

sun york janThe next LYPFT York, Service User Network Meeting will be held on 30th January 2015. The network covers Easingwold, Selby and Tadcaster as well as York. I am pleased to inform you that a representative from the Charity Together: for Mental Wellbeing which is an initiative to tackle mental health issues working with vulnerable groups of people who as a result of mental distress are intensive users of council, police, ambulance and fire services is going to attend to provide an update of the project and how it operates within this area.

As ever all are most welcome.

sun leeds janThe next LYPFT Leeds Service User Network meeting will be held on 7th January; the topic will be Spirituality. All welcome to come along; if you want to know a little more about what the meetings are like, then click here. The minutes from the December 2014 can be found here.

 

Integrated Care Pathways in Mental Health

Jo Fryer and Emma Metcalf explain what Integrated Care Pathways are and how these are being developed at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (LYPFT):

Hi there, the trust is developing pathways that set out minimum standards of what people should expect and receive during their care. We thought it would be useful to outline work done so far, and what we are doing next. Below is some information that will hopefully be useful: 

What is an Integrated Care Pathway (ICP)?

An Integrated Care Pathway:

  • maps what should be done, when and by whom
  • sets a minimum standard of care
  • incorporates relevant guidelines, standards and protocols

Why have LYPFT developed ICP’s?

ICP’s identify:

  • the right people
  • doing the right things
  • in the right order
  • at the right time
  • in the right place

all with the attention to the individuals journey.

They also reduce unnecessary duplication and variation and are outcome and wellbeing / recovery focussed.

The trust has developed a ‘Core’ ICP that builds upon the information gathered at the assessment.  Areas of need anyone may experience regardless of ‘diagnosis’ will help develop individual care plans; other areas of need may include:

  • Mental health and/or Learning Difficulties
  • Physical health
  • Social, Occupational & Vocational
  • Medication
  • Discharge planning
  • Carers and Family interventions
  • Finances
  • Housing
  • Supporting and Safeguarding children
  • Safeguarding adults
  • Engagement
  • Advocacy
  • Diversity
  • Safety & Risk
  • Advanced decisions
  • Substance Use
  • Mental Health Act
  • Mental Capacity Act

In addition to these, specific needs based interventions describe the specific, expert interventions recommended by NICE and other best practice guidance for people with specific needs around Cognitive Impairment / Dementia, Psychosis and Common Mental Health issues.

We are currently working on how we can make the information meaningful and accessible for all and the best way of doing this eg the Trust web site. We will also be undertaking consultations with people who use our services.

Thank you for taking the time to read this and we hope you found it a useful introduction to ICP’s.

If you have any comments or questions please feel free to post them on here or email planningcarelypft@nhs.net

Jo, ICP Development Manager & Emma, ICP Developer

Social Prescriptions

Keeping up to date with what is happening across Leeds is made a lot easier through Volition. Their latest newsletter is here; I was particularly interested in the Patient  Empowerment Project (PEP)  providing Social Prescriptions to people in West Leeds:

Barca Leeds

“The main aim is to improve the wider health and wellbeing of patients.  The project will improve services for patients by providing GPs with a link to refer patients to local groups and community activities in the voluntary sector.  Referred patients will be supported either in a group, or one-to-one to help them to develop the skills, knowledge and confidence to self-manage their condition. This approach is called  ‘social prescribing’.  The ambition is to connect up GP clinical treatments with community based solutions to help people to manage their health issues as effectively as possible”.

My understanding is that people in west Leeds can also self refer – here is a description of how it will work:

“Discussion with the patient will clarify what will work for them and information on the project will be provided.  If a referral is agreed, PEP will make contact and meet the patient to discuss how best they may be supported by available services.  This might be one to one support or linking to a group or activity.  PEP staff will provide personal support for patients to attend their first session and get started in a new group, service or activity”.

You can read more about the project and arrange to attend one of the information sessioons here; I am keen to see how this links up with LYPFT, this would be very useful for people accesing mental health services to link in closely with the wider community to boost their health and wellbeing.

What’s your view on this – would you refer as a care coordinator? Would you encourage people to self refer?

Choice: a priority for people accessing mental health services?

At Leeds and York Partnership  NHS Foundation Trust we are developing guidance for staff to help ensure that people are offered choice, including choice of worker. What is your view on people being offered a choice of worker? Please complete this quick poll, responses are anonymous.

If you would like to contribute to the development of this guidance or want to share your views to inform its development, then please contact donna.kemp@nhs.net Click here to read the comments from Twitter

Choice is a hot topic in Mental Health at the moment. People will be able to choose where they have their first outpatient appointment under choose and book, providing equal status between physical and mental health services.  This is a welcome move, but is only part of the story; Dr Sean Lennon writes about the broader picture of choice, of collaborating with service users, empowering people to make autonomous decisions about their own care and lives “Mental health service users are no different from anyone else in that they want to be able to exercise choice. They want to be treated with respect and be supported by skilled staff to receive high-quality care. Freedom of choice is absolutely fundamental to these aspirations”. You can read the full story here.

Locally, people attending the Service User Network (SUN) pulled together their views about choice and how they want to be treated within mental health services. The discussions were lively – clearly people had strong views about this and there were many stories highlighting the importance of choice and how it makes a difference to the persons experience and their progress. You can read about ‘Choice and how people want to be treated: key messages from SUN’ here.  There is more information about Leeds SUN here; you can click here for details about a developing service user group in York and there is also the Independent Mental Health Service User Forum, you can read about how to contact them and what they do here.

 

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What are your questions about bipolar?

Service User Network: what it’s all about

SUN logo.JPG 3

Here, Bev Thornton and Anne Perry tell us all about the Service User Network…….

What is the Service User Network (SUN)?

It’s a monthly get together which service users, carers and staff attend to share their ideas, give feedback and shared experiences which are used to directly influence practice. The main aim of the group is to work hand in hand with Trust aimed at improving services provided.

The events have a very friendly atmosphere which is hosted by two recovery and social inclusion workers, Bev bec and anneThornton and Anne Perry, who help encourage service users to give their views on topics that relate directly to the members.

Service users are also encouraged to participate in community involvement events as well as socialising and bringing general queries about Trust services to SUN. SUN meetings are based on the Recovery principles of empowerment, hope and equality, acceptance, choice, actively encouraging interest and participation in doing something meaningful, believing in people.  At the same time incorporating the Trusts values of respect, dignity, commitment to quality of care, working together, improving lives, compassion, and everyone counts.

SUN has guest speakers every month to involve and advise the service users giving them valuable information and two way feedback in aiding service users continued personal recovery.

Who are the SUN members?

They are service users, carer’s and staff who represent a diverse community groups.  Bev and Anne have promoted the SUN to outside community groups and have established a good attendance from these groups, providing diverse and wide range of knowledge and life experiences.

Current Membership

Current membership is 47.  Bev and Anne are continually canvassing to increase membership.  They are now looking to establish a SUN in the West of Leeds and in the future the South.

 What can SUN do for me?

You can bring your ideas or concerns about Trust Services to SUN and it will be reported to the Trust governance/committee meetings for comment and action ensuring service users issues are addressed and dealt with.

From service users point of view SUN has helped them in their own recovery by giving them a voice, which is listened to and valued.  For example changes to the Care Programme Approach were due directly to service user’s feedback, which shows how valued and respected the SUN’s opinion is.

People are encouraged to tell their own stories, which prove to be a positive experience for all service users and unites the group. People are invited to participate in involvement requests from the Trust i.e. interview panels, Psychiatrist training, test ward rounds prior to Care Quality Commission inspections

SUN‘s success has meant that all Trust policies and procedures are brought to SUN for consultation prior to implementation.

When and where does SUN & mini SUN meet?

St Chad’s

The first Wednesday of every month 12.45 to 15.00 at St Chad’s Community Hall, Otley Road, Headingley, Leeds, LS16 5JT.  Refreshments are provided.  Public Travel expenses can be reimbursed.

sun members say

 

Advance Statements in LYPFT

When I am ill, I am not quite me, I do not want to speak, I want to be left alone, my carers think I am being difficult but this is how I deal with my illness.  How can I convey this to my carers?” Diane  

Answer: through an Advance Statement

advanced statements


What is aAdvance Statement?

It is a contingency plan or a wish list that a service user writes when they are feeling well in the event of them not being well.  It should cover what they would like to happen concerning their wellbeing and lists their choice in care and treatment.  It can let staff know what care needs/medications work for them and which one’s don’t.  It can also let staff know about any physical needs or disabilities they have ensuring these needs are met.  It can help in planning things to run smoothly whilst they are ill e.g. who is taking care of the children, bills, pets etc.

What an Advance Statement cannot do for the service user:

It cannot ensure they get their preferred treatment, as it is not legally binding.  It cannot stop them from being treated against their will if they are sectioned under the mental health act.

It is all about Choice:

It gives the service user more control in their recovery, making sure their choices over childcare, pet care, bills etc are know and so elevating any unnecessary worrying.

sun logo 2Choice is a key reoccurring theme that runs through the discussions we have at the Service User Network (SUN) which meet every month on the first Wednesday afternoon of the month, at St Chads Community Centre, Headingley.  Service users are encouraged to give their observation on services/care and these are addressed at the clinical governance group.  They are given the choice to contribute by having their say on how things are done.  This has resulted in changes in care delivery .e.g. Care Programme Approach.  So choices and using your voice can influence the services you receive which will also directly affect service user’s recovery.

Where can you get an Advance Statement? 

Easy, there is a template at: www.leedsandyorkpft.nhs.uk/service_users/Advancedstatements with guidance notes.

The service user’s psychiatrist, care co-ordinator, health support worker, or occupational therapist can help them fill in the form.   It is a good idea to discuss it with their friends and family as they might have advice which could help their plan. It doesn’t have to be written on an official Advanced Statement document for it to be valid but you need your family, friends and care worker to know about it and the Trust can hold a copy which should be reviewed every year.

How many advance statements are we aware of within the Trust? 

There are 57, which is not enough when you consider that approximately 20,000 people use Trust services.

What can we do to help promote advance statements? 

Make sure people are aware of them and encourage the use of them throughout the Trust.

If YOU were given a choice in care, wouldn’t you want to take up that choice?  

Of course you would, so please help promote Advanced Statements now.

Written by Anne Perry, Recovery & Social Inclusion Team

If you require further information about Advance Statements, then please contact Beverley Thornton on 0113 3056755/58  or email beverley.thornton1@nhs.net

Mental Health Peer Support in Action

sunbeam

Mental Health Peer Support in Action

A ray of sunshine arrived via email recently, it made me go “YES!” and the author, Andrew Johnson, agreed that it was ok to share. This reiterates the importance of  access to peer support for people experiencing mental health difficulties:-

Hi Donna – 

I was lucky enough to be around the other day whilst one of LYPFT’s Peer Support Worker’s was busy about their usual business.  What I witnessed was a brilliant, yet entirely ordinary piece of work and I felt I had to pass comment. 

The three parties involved (worker/patient/carer) had a prior knowledge of each other achieved through use of services and the therapeutic relationship was pre-established and well grounded. This enabled the PSW to freely discuss the benefits and disadvantages of a particular anti-psychotic medication that they themselves had experience of using in a way I had not witnessed before, seamlessly interweaving relevant clinical information with social themes and everyday off topic conversations. Familiar recovery barriers around professional distancing, stigma et al just didn’t stand a chance! 

The rapport, warmth and authenticity on display during this interaction made a real impression on me and really underlined the value of sharing Lived Experience in practice in an atmosphere of mutuality and collaboration.

Sure I understand that not all practitioners – and not all patients – value the ‘timid revolution of Lived Experience in practice’, but if we are really serious about improving health, improving lives then we must find a way of doing more. 

 Andy

Learn more about Lived Experience in the Workforce here.

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