A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health

Posts tagged ‘recovery’

Creative Practitioners hosting free Wellbeing Event in Leeds

I have been hearing a lot about the new Creative Practitioners at Aire Court lately; I harangued Zellany to write a blog post about the new role and about a drop in session on the 22nd of June……..

Hi all

I’ve not written a blog piece before, so I am hoping you will bear with me and not get too bored before the end.

It was about writing a piece to explain my new role and who I am! I have recently gained employment with LYPFT in February this year as a Creative Practitioner. There are two of us based with the South CMHT in Leeds….so we are a rare breed indeed!

Before I get started! I would like to draw your attention a FREE drop-in wellbeing event that is taken place on the 22nd June at BITMO Gate, Belle Isle. It runs from 10am until 12.30pm.

zellany

The event is open to the community as a whole and professionals alike. The idea is to try to create independence and empower users of secondary services to link up with community based organisations. This is as part of a sustainable discharge and recovery from Community Mental Health Team. It will be a drop-in, so can come and go as people wish. The idea is to promote positive mental wellbeing and hopefully help reduce stigma which may exist in the locality. It will also support in promoting social inclusion, enabling people to take an active role in maintaining their mental health and general wellbeing. A map can be found here.

The wellbeing event is open to the whole community in the South of the City. The event is being organised by my colleague, Minja and me. The organisations who have so far agreed to participate are:

It will also be an opportunity for you to meet Minja and me!

I terms of my background, I have worked as statutory social worker for the past 6 years based within a Community Mental Health Team in Bradford. I can honestly say that I have occasionally felt like a square peg trying to fit in to a round hole. This has at times created friction and tension between my own value base with the needs and agenda of the service I had worked for.

My values have always been about putting the client/service user at the centre of care planning, in terms of collaborative working to advocate in obtaining an individualised bespoke support package. I have my feet firmly planted in the social model rather than the medical model of mental health; our mental health is shaped by our experiences and our environments.

Austere times are making it much harder for services to meet people’s needs. There are reduced budgets and smaller teams of people, this has forced the whole system to look at its processes and having to work leaner and smarter. Organisations have to justify their service delivery through outcome measures. I feel that these measures do not at times reflect the outcomes users of services visualise for themselves.

Recovery is an individual journey with personal and individual goals. These goals come from our own set of values and experiences. So when I saw the role of Creative Practitioners advertised, I spoke with my now two enthusiastic Managers and I was sold by their visualisation and their recovery oriented and social model views with regards to mental health and wellbeing; it fits with my own values! The role is something that my colleague and I can develop and mould overtime. Hopefully we will have a positive impact on service delivery and new ways of working……what an opportunity!

In essence the Creative Practitioners role is about supporting people to move on from secondary mental health services in terms of a sustainable discharge. We are working in a creative and innovative manner, developing relationships with Care Coordinators and their clients. We have also been building links in with the voluntary sector services. I feel it is about looking at ways of building on a person’s resilience and strengths, to take control of their own recovery through empowerment.

Within a short space of time, my colleague and I have developed links with agencies and organisations across Leeds. These agencies are providing various levels of community support and activities that promote health and wellbeing. We have sought views from users of services through Leeds Involving People. We have attended local events that support the process of shaping how mental health care and wellbeing is delivered within the City. The landscape is being transformed and the service user movement’s voice certainly has a place and a big impact on how things will change. Leeds has a variety of ways of involving people to participate and get their voice heard such as through Leeds Involving People, Service User Network, Leeds Healthwatch and Patient Advice Liaise Service as well as through various voluntary sector services e.g. Mind’s Peers Support and Touchstone.

We Creative Practitioners have developed group work to facilitate a step down approach from services. It is hoped that those attending will recognise their strengths and build on their resilience. They will be supported to develop a wellbeing and crisis plan. This is hoped it will empower those being discharged to become independent of secondary services and feel able to take control of their recovery; mental health services are only part of that journey to recovery.

What I have found so far with regard to working for LYPFT, is that the team is supportive, progressive and forward thinking. The CMHT management team have been willing to listen to and run with ideas; this is certainly not in a maverick way. Despite such austere times, I feel it is an exciting moment to be involved in mental health services. I feel there is a decrease in the divide; users of services are able to get involved and have their say in shaping how services will be delivered, this is the spirit of true co-production. I am certainly feeling hopeful!

If you require further information regarding the wellbeing event or queries about our role, then please do not hesitate to contact me Zellany.neal@nhs.net or my colleague minja.lintunen@nhs.net

 

 

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New Mental Health Recovery Group

Here, Elaine Wilkes, Carers Education Worker writes about a new group to support people in Leeds:

I am really excited this morning along with my colleague Lokhi Roy!  We both work as part of Leeds Carers and stated a new group last night based on Mental Health Recovery!

recovery header

The group runs at Vale Circles once every two weeks from 5.30pm-7pm.  It is based on a group that has been running at Lovell Park for five years. Click here for the dates and venue details.

So why the excitement?  Well I experience depression and this is a group where anyone can come along if they have an interest in mental recovery.  This is:

  • Workers
  • People who have mental health problems
  • Carers
  • Anyone who is a combination of all the above

The group focuses on:

  • Hope that recovery can happen
  • Looking at things in a positive way
  • Knowing we experience negative things but looking at the type of things we do to overcome these

My dad died last March and I went to the Lovell Park  group  the week after his funeral.  I was ok but still at times tearful.  A member of the group mentioned railways (which my Dad loved) and I could feel myself becoming tearful.  I did not feel the need to hide the tears but talked about being upset by his death.  This led to other people talking about how they had overcome difficult things including deaths of people close to them.  I went away from that group feeling supported and more positive.  We also talked about techniques that can help all us cope at tough times

My hope for the Vale Circles Recovery Group is that we can develop a safe place where anyone feels comfortable to talk about things that are emotional and hard.  For me the key thing is we don’t stop there but focus on hope, how we can overcome pain and techniques to help all us of do this.

I don’t think it matters whether someone is a service user, carer or worker or all of these.  What matters to me is that we are people  and we all have things that are hard.  This group is about overcoming these things but also have fun and humour along the way.

If you would like further information about these sessions or to book yourself a place please contact 0113 85 54445 and ask for Elaine Wilkes or Lokhi Roy.

Spirituality & Recovery Event

Guest post from Bev:

Service User Network meet monthly. It is for people who are or who have accessed LYPFT services within the past 12 months, including carers.

In January 2015 we had Reverend Michael Mkpadi attend to discuss Spirituality and Recovery. We all completed a Compassionate Care survey, to score from a list of values their importance, when people are unwell; here are the top themes:

sun dec 2015Love

Being accepted

Trust

Safety

Compassion

Peace

Patience

Kindness 

The event in January was well attended, over 40  people were there. It was a very inspirational interactive discussion, where all  people shared their own spiritual experiences. Everyone’s feedback was extremely positive and they requested this session should be repeated again. You can read the testimonials here

I wish to advertise  16th December SUN meeting (see poster above) where  we will again be  discussing with Michael Mkpadi Spirituality and Recovery. I hope to see many new faces there. If you wish to find out more information please contact the Chair Bev Thornton, details on the poster.

Thanks

 

Exciting Start to 2015 for Recovery Service

It’s been an exciting but fast-paced start to 2015, For those of us in Rehabilitation and Recovery Services over at Asket Croft/House.

As you may remember from our previous post introducing ourselves as the new Recovery Centre partnership team, and outlining the planned changes to R&R services, things had been building here at Asket in the lead up to Christmas, culminating in the big ‘moving week’ from 5th January. On this date, the Millside R&R inpatient unit closed its doors and, with the help of lots of vans and plenty of extra staff on hand, service users were supported in moving to their new homes on either the new Asket Croft ward, or the more independent Asket House ward. The following day, the same happened at the Towngate unit, meaning by Wednesday both the Croft and House were fully operational.

It wasn’t just our service users who were moving though. The closing of Millside and Towngate has also meant that existing inpatient staff who had been working on these units have also moved bases and teams, coming together to get to know their new colleagues and find their feet on new wards – as well as getting to know ourselves in the Recovery Centre team and finding out more about what our role will be alongside working alongside them. It has been a challenging but exciting period of change for all, with lots to work out as the teams with existing ways of working have all merged – whether that’s where to have handover or where to put plates in the kitchens!

road to recoveryAt the Recovery Centre not much changed in our office that week, but there were certainly many memorable afternoons spent putting our moving and handling training to full use, moving LOTS of old boxes, whiteboards, bits of furniture and mini fridges around the site that had arrived direct from Millside and Towngate, supporting the inpatient staff with practical issues to ensure things went as smoothly as possible. Sorting through the boxes was certainly quite a big job as we went through a wealth of old files, service information, CDs, books – even discovering a fetching top hat along the way. It also meant that we were also able to meet service users for the first time and support them in some unpacking which was very valuable, however. At times it may have felt quite overwhelming for all involved, but it was mostly quite exciting to get stuck in and see the move in action!

During the last few weeks since the move, the Recovery Centre team have continued with much of the same work as we had started before Christmas, becoming involved with the Croft and House at a gradual pace to allow the inpatient staff to find their feet in their new teams and develop relationships with service users first and foremost. We have started attending ward rounds, handovers and the service users’ Your Views meeting to introduce ourselves, and have felt welcomed. Some of the care coordinators within our team have even begun new assessments. As with the start of any brand new team – particularly what with the LYPFT and 3rd sector partnership working that we have taking place in our team – there have been practical issues to solve too, for example how will we use PARIS as a team and where will we record our notes? Which care coordinator will supervise which recovery worker? How can the third sector staff ensure they keep strong links with their parent organisations in this partnership? Where exactly do we keep our tea and coffee?

There may have been a few bumps in the road, but we are looking forward to the next few months now things look clearer and as we start to undertake more and more clinical work. We have also been joined by a new Leeds Mind recovery worker this week, James, and will also be joined by another recovery worker from Touchstone in the coming weeks, and this has given us a great opportunity to reflect on the journey of our team so far. Now that the all-important allocations meeting for care coordinators has taken place, it really feels like we can really get going soon.

Now to look to March and beyond…

by Jude Taylor, Recovery Worker

Follow us @leedsmhrecovery

Recovery Centre at LYPFT – its here!

In this post, Charlotte and the rest of the team tell us about the service and the new team………..

Introducing the Recovery Centre

It’s been an exciting few months here at the new Recovery Centre, based at Asket Croft in Seacroft, as our new partnership team prepares to welcome service users onto the two new Rehabilitation and Recovery inpatient units following a review of our existing R and R service structure over the last 18 months. The redesign of the service has been put in place to provide more of a focus on rehabilitation and recovery into the community, rather than just on inpatient care. There are 2 R and R inpatient units both based on the Asket site in Seacroft, 1 supported and 1 independent (hoping to be similar to a therapeutic community), in addition to the opening of the Recovery Centre partnership team – us! – who will also be based on this site.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of our team at the Recovery Centre is that we are a partnership of workers from LYPFT, Leeds Mind, Community Links and Touchstone, coming together to share our individual skills and diverse levels of experience to ensure we can offer a range of support for service users as we aim to empower them to become more independent. Bringing together workers from LYPFT with workers from third sector organisations is an exciting opportunity, but as the team is brand new, it has meant we’ve all needed a few weeks to get to know each other and establish our new team, as well as set out our core values and aims.
The Recovery Centre team itself consists of care co-ordinators and recovery workers, some of whom started straight away at Asket Croft, others spending time within their parent organisations – for example, working in the Leeds Mind peer support service. The team will also be working with consultants, psychologists and social workers. The full team finally came together in person however at the start of December, with a full week of teambuilding and training, with the prospect of service users moving onto the Asket site from 5th January.
team building2Teambuilding was a particularly important part of our induction, mainly as we were coming together from a range of places to work in a brand new service, with a range of expectations, ideas and questions. A full first day hosted by Community Links gave us the chance to get to know each other and where we had all come from, as well as a chance to begin to discuss our team values and aims, leading to further discussion on these as the induction week progressed, encouraging us to begin to think about how we can as both individuals and teams make them grow. It was clear from early on in our induction that we all share core values of recovery, service user involvement and ensuring our approach is fully person-centred, keeping in line with our ultimate aim of empowering service users and supporting them to become more independent. It wasn’t all just flipchart work either – we had plenty of teambuilding activities and icebreakers, and arguably one of the most enjoyable parts of our induction week was a teambuilding trip to York, visiting the Christmas markets and getting to know each other a little more outside of the office environment!
As the Recovery Centre is brand new, training opportunities within our induction have also given us the chance to begin to develop our own best practice guides and policies, based on our core team values and aims. We have been able to discuss and explore potential opportunities for service user involvement at all levels of the service and involving service users throughout the care pathway – for example, involving service users in the recruitment of staff, or guiding service users in co-facilitating group sessions and workshops in the community to develop their own skills. We have also been able to develop our own Recovery Centre policies on boundaries and sharing experience (important as some workers within the team bring their own personal lived experience to their work with a peer support approach), and on how we will deliver Care Programme Approach (CPA) and how service users can be more involved in the CPA process themselves, potentially even leading their own CPA review meetings if comfortable.
Another large part of our induction was becoming more comfortable with and knowledgeable about each organisation in the partnership, and visiting other local community-based services and resources as our work will be a mixture of in-reach onto the inpatient units and outreach into the community. This has ranged from chatting to each other about our backgrounds and parent organisations, to more structured sessions, such as a workshop on peer support from Leeds Mind, led by staff and volunteers, and a visit to Touchstone and their community support team. The R and R psychology team who will be working with us delivered a session on formulation and how it will apply to our work, and our consultant psychiatrists also led a discussion on the work of medics within R and R, which was important in ensuring everyone was on the same page with regards to roles within the team.
All in all, our team induction has been a thoroughly enjoyable and interesting time – and we look forward to beginning our work with service users in a few weeks’ time!
(Follow us on Twitter at @LeedsMHRecovery)

York Service User Network

sun. novThe York Service User Network started in September 2014 and now meets monthly. The next meeting is on Friday 28th November at 1.15 and is at a new venue on Friargate. The meetings are relaxed and informal, the first half hour is devoted to welcoming people and sharing a cuppa. There is an agenda and this month there will be a discussion about Recovery, followed by a Q & A session. Some time will be put by to discuss the coming year and what the group would like to be included on the agenda. Everyone is welcome!

 

 

Safety Planning – a risky business?

Lynne Maskill is LYPFT’s CPA and Risk Trainer, as an occupational therapist with a clinical background in Mental Health, Lynne talks about safety and risk and poses some pertinent questions about current challenges…..

Understanding someone’s risk and helping people keep safe is a key part of working with people in mental health services. Developing and agreeing a risk management plan with the person, and where possible with carers is central, not forgetting, who is responsible for what, what helps and what does not.  So, all straight forward in terms of good practice and sounding like a risk trainer?LM wordle

But actually to what extent are practitioners actually sharing the plans with people they are about?  How do risk management plans connect with care plans and crisis plans? Some practitioners have said to me that a risk management plan tends to be more service focused, letting staff know what they need to do to prevent or minimise harm, whereas a well-developed crisis plan is a way of helping the person using services manage their distress or increase in symptoms. Is this also not about safety, reduction in harm, risks in relapse?  Furthermore how do crisis plans fit with wellness and recovery action plans?  … and advance statements?

I could go on but  the point I am getting to is, are we making things too complicated? How do we plan and document how we are working with people around safety in a way which is meaningful and as inclusive as possible to the person , supports recovery, lets staff know what they need to do and how best to help  ……….and if possible reduce time at a computer?

 

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