A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health

For anyone thinking of applying to do their degree in Mental Health Nursing…..

donnajkemp

One of the things that potential mental health nursing candidates are required to know is what a mental health nurse does; what is their role? As a degree entry profession since 2011 nursing candidates apply for their courses through UCAS, the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service. Candidates need to provide their demographic details, their qualifications, a reference and a personal statement. For many pre- registration mental health nursing courses the personal statement is the deal breaker; the quality of the personal statement is the difference between rejecting the candidate and inviting them to come along for an interview.

Admissions tutors typically look for a number for a number of things within the application and statement: does the candidate meet (or is predicted to meet) the entry requirements? Does the reference support the application – I have yet to see a reference that doesn’t; are there transferable skills evident; are their personal values…

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thestrongestsmile

c1f3cfba43447024c694d99d945d8b74-2

Oh my word by anyone’s standards 2016 has been difficult for me in so many ways with family illness then subsequent bereavement with one of those family members, our ongoing infertility issues, a cancer scare and a change of job with pressures which have left me questioning my own capabilities daily. I feel like I have spent months walking a tight rope with my own mental well being. I have written recently about how I have felt here

I’m a mental health nurse, not a circus acrobat, so walking an emotional tight rope has felt dangerous. I have stumbled and nearly fallen on so many occasions, arms outstretched with a wobble and a dance the one we all do until just at the last moment we correct out footing and just about manage to prevent the fall. My colleagues and I are all mental health professionals; nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists and…

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donnajkemp

Last week I was fortunate enough to be invited to the COCAPP Knowledge Transfer event held at City University London on 21st July 2016. You can read more about this here.

It was great to meet people face to face, beyond Twitter – particularly Alan Simpson (PI) Ben Hannigan, and Michael Coffey who are leading this important NIHR funded research, #COCAPPimpact.

Whats really good about this piece of research is that it is within my area of interest and that the method used aimed to address care planning on 3 levels – macro (national), meso (organisation) and micro (care delivery, face to face). To achieve this they used a mixed methods approach . The fabulousness of this is that it answered the research question on the 3 levels, perhaps anticipating that tackling one level in isolation would give rise to questions in the other levels. Adding to the credibility is…

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mhnurses

What are we trying to do?

Outputs from this third blog will contribute to a report to be produced by the Foundation of Nursing Studies (www.fons.org) at the end of 2016 on the present and future work of mental health nurses. As a graduate profession, mental health nurses must now be confident enough to offer a constructive debate about their work rather than playing a limited part in policy development and service re-design. We hope the approach used in Playing our part will allow us to think differently by asking purposeful questions and sometimes we will allow ourselves to think disruptively! We want to put mental health nurses in a place where they can proactively contribute to service delivery. This third blog is to stimulate early discussion towards developing a contemporary view of the work of mental health nurses in tertiary care. We wish to explore existing and…

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mhnurses

  • Questions and themes

  • Is in-patient care therapeutic setting?
  • How do we tackle continuity of care?
  • Safe staffing as a key requirement
  • The nature of ‘recovery’ as a descriptor of service provision/experience
  • Emerging discussions that followed

  • Service design obliges patients to be in and out as fast as possible
  • Staffing levels make an obvious and critical difference
  • ‘Recovery’ is an unhelpful descriptor but no agreement on what else to call it
  •  Access to education and knowledge is empowering
  • Acute in-patient care requires the right staff, it has to do with leading meaningful lives,
  • A ‘healthy’ environment and quiet areas for residents are critical for therapeutic in-patient care
  • From a patients point of view the ‘boundaries of primary, secondary and tertiary care are blurred.
  • Continuity of care is a useful concept to guide the work of mental health nurses and service design.

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Reimagining Professionalism in mental health: towards co-production

Co-production involves a redistribution of power. In the first instance, this requires respect for people’s choices and preferences about their care.  For this reason, policy initiatives such as the introduction of personal budgets and the personalisation agenda constitute progress – they help to re-instate marginalised people as self-determining citizens. Choice is a cornerstone of co-production, but, equally, it should be about much more than this. People sometimes wonder how personalisation differs from co-production. My response is that co-production supports people’s choices but recognises that they do not make choices in circumstances of their own choosing. Many people in mental distress are caught up in complex and oppressive entanglement of powers which severely constrain choices.

What about a person who can’t face getting out of bed because of the emotional, mental, social and material challenges which they face? ‘Fine’, some would say, ‘that’s their choice’. After all, it’s a key liberal…

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Blogs on Nursing

Once a bit of time had passed after my mum died in February (a terrible end of life experience for her and the family, some of it blogged here), I asked for her notes. I wanted to see how she had been cared for in a professional sense. I wanted to see the decision making, the prescribing, the carrying out of care. I wanted to know who had cared for her, who had assessed her need for nursing, who had signed off nursing interventions, who had recorded her care.

I filled in the form, paid my £10 and duly received a 3 inch pile of paper. 0.1 inch of the papers were the medical notes. Handwritten but largely legible, dated and signed, succinct, little diagrams where necessary. Referrals noted with date and time, and followed up with results. OT visits and assessments were written in the medical notes.  Physio…

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Ben Hannigan's blog

Earlier this week a new article lead authored by Mohammad Marie, and co-authored by Aled Jones and me, was published in the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. The title of the article is Resilience of nurses who work in community mental
health workplaces in Palestine
, and is the second paper arising from Mohammad’s completed PhD. As the article appears in gold open access form copies can be directly downloaded from the journal’s website for free: or indeed, by clicking either the hyperlinked title or image above.

The larger part of Mohammad’s qualitative dataset is interviews conducted with CMHNs working in the West Bank. Fifteen practitioners took part, from a total population of 17. For the record, that’s 17 community mental health nurses for a population of some three million people. That’s an astonishingly low number by UK standards; for more on mental health needs…

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mhnurses

What are we trying to do?

Outputs from this second blog will contribute to a report to be produced by the Foundation of Nursing Studies (www.fons.org) at the end of 2016 on the present and future work of mental health nurses. As a graduate profession, mental health nurses must now be confident enough to offer a constructive debate about their work rather than playing a limited part in policy development and service re-design. We hope the approach used in Playing our part will allow us to think differently by asking purposeful questions and sometimes we will allow ourselves to think disruptively! We want to put mental health nurses in a place where they can proactively contribute to service delivery.
This second blog is to stimulate early discussion towards developing a contemporary view of the work of mental health nurses. We wish to explore existing and further potential for working in

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Reimagining Professionalism in mental health: towards co-production

We are please to announce the third seminar in the ESRC Seminar Series ‘Reimagining professionalism in mental health: towards co-production’.

This seminar will consider co-production in the light of new practices in mental health. These include the advent of specialised low- and high-intensity psychological services for people with common mental health problems, funded by the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme; the introduction of new professional roles (such as Psychological Well-being Practitioners, Cognitive Behavioural Therapists Associate Practitioners), and the changing roles of mental health nurses. New initiatives designed to promote coproduction, for example through service user-led recovery work and personalisation will be discussed from a variety of stakeholder perspectives in relation to the evidence drawn from the Connecting People Intervention.

Speakers and participants at the seminar series will come from diverse groups: service users, carers, professionals working in third sector, and public and statutory organisations, and academics. Academics in…

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Reimagining Professionalism in mental health: towards co-production

Conference on Co-production by Touchstone and Leeds Involving People on 9 June

Register Here

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I have been hearing a lot about the new Creative Practitioners at Aire Court lately; I harangued Zellany to write a blog post about the new role and about a drop in session on the 22nd of June……..

Hi all

I’ve not written a blog piece before, so I am hoping you will bear with me and not get too bored before the end.

It was about writing a piece to explain my new role and who I am! I have recently gained employment with LYPFT in February this year as a Creative Practitioner. There are two of us based with the South CMHT in Leeds….so we are a rare breed indeed!

Before I get started! I would like to draw your attention a FREE drop-in wellbeing event that is taken place on the 22nd June at BITMO Gate, Belle Isle. It runs from 10am until 12.30pm.

zellany

The event is open to the community as a whole and professionals alike. The idea is to try to create independence and empower users of secondary services to link up with community based organisations. This is as part of a sustainable discharge and recovery from Community Mental Health Team. It will be a drop-in, so can come and go as people wish. The idea is to promote positive mental wellbeing and hopefully help reduce stigma which may exist in the locality. It will also support in promoting social inclusion, enabling people to take an active role in maintaining their mental health and general wellbeing. A map can be found here.

The wellbeing event is open to the whole community in the South of the City. The event is being organised by my colleague, Minja and me. The organisations who have so far agreed to participate are:

It will also be an opportunity for you to meet Minja and me!

I terms of my background, I have worked as statutory social worker for the past 6 years based within a Community Mental Health Team in Bradford. I can honestly say that I have occasionally felt like a square peg trying to fit in to a round hole. This has at times created friction and tension between my own value base with the needs and agenda of the service I had worked for.

My values have always been about putting the client/service user at the centre of care planning, in terms of collaborative working to advocate in obtaining an individualised bespoke support package. I have my feet firmly planted in the social model rather than the medical model of mental health; our mental health is shaped by our experiences and our environments.

Austere times are making it much harder for services to meet people’s needs. There are reduced budgets and smaller teams of people, this has forced the whole system to look at its processes and having to work leaner and smarter. Organisations have to justify their service delivery through outcome measures. I feel that these measures do not at times reflect the outcomes users of services visualise for themselves.

Recovery is an individual journey with personal and individual goals. These goals come from our own set of values and experiences. So when I saw the role of Creative Practitioners advertised, I spoke with my now two enthusiastic Managers and I was sold by their visualisation and their recovery oriented and social model views with regards to mental health and wellbeing; it fits with my own values! The role is something that my colleague and I can develop and mould overtime. Hopefully we will have a positive impact on service delivery and new ways of working……what an opportunity!

In essence the Creative Practitioners role is about supporting people to move on from secondary mental health services in terms of a sustainable discharge. We are working in a creative and innovative manner, developing relationships with Care Coordinators and their clients. We have also been building links in with the voluntary sector services. I feel it is about looking at ways of building on a person’s resilience and strengths, to take control of their own recovery through empowerment.

Within a short space of time, my colleague and I have developed links with agencies and organisations across Leeds. These agencies are providing various levels of community support and activities that promote health and wellbeing. We have sought views from users of services through Leeds Involving People. We have attended local events that support the process of shaping how mental health care and wellbeing is delivered within the City. The landscape is being transformed and the service user movement’s voice certainly has a place and a big impact on how things will change. Leeds has a variety of ways of involving people to participate and get their voice heard such as through Leeds Involving People, Service User Network, Leeds Healthwatch and Patient Advice Liaise Service as well as through various voluntary sector services e.g. Mind’s Peers Support and Touchstone.

We Creative Practitioners have developed group work to facilitate a step down approach from services. It is hoped that those attending will recognise their strengths and build on their resilience. They will be supported to develop a wellbeing and crisis plan. This is hoped it will empower those being discharged to become independent of secondary services and feel able to take control of their recovery; mental health services are only part of that journey to recovery.

What I have found so far with regard to working for LYPFT, is that the team is supportive, progressive and forward thinking. The CMHT management team have been willing to listen to and run with ideas; this is certainly not in a maverick way. Despite such austere times, I feel it is an exciting moment to be involved in mental health services. I feel there is a decrease in the divide; users of services are able to get involved and have their say in shaping how services will be delivered, this is the spirit of true co-production. I am certainly feeling hopeful!

If you require further information regarding the wellbeing event or queries about our role, then please do not hesitate to contact me Zellany.neal@nhs.net or my colleague minja.lintunen@nhs.net

 

 

LYPFT Planning Care Network

online conversaton

Throughout March, 10 staff-listening events we held across our Trust, in which over 200 staff shared their views about their experience of working here and the experience we provide to the communities we serve.

The commitment and compassion of everyone was impressive. All staff want to do a great job and feel proud of the quality of care we provide. We agreed that staff need time to develop meaningful relationships with service users and carers to support people to improve their lives.

Together, we also agreed some changes that we are going to make this year and agreed that we need real clarity about our future direction. With a shared understanding of where we’re all going, we’ll be more likely to pull in the same direction and consistently deliver the highest quality services that everyone wants.

We must create this future direction together with service users, carers, Trust members and…

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online conversaton

Throughout March, 10 staff-listening events we held across our Trust, in which over 200 staff shared their views about their experience of working here and the experience we provide to the communities we serve.

The commitment and compassion of everyone was impressive. All staff want to do a great job and feel proud of the quality of care we provide. We agreed that staff need time to develop meaningful relationships with service users and carers to support people to improve their lives.

Together, we also agreed some changes that we are going to make this year and agreed that we need real clarity about our future direction. With a shared understanding of where we’re all going, we’ll be more likely to pull in the same direction and consistently deliver the highest quality services that everyone wants.

We must create this future direction together with service users, carers, Trust members and other stakeholders. Specifically, we need to:

 re-imagine what the future of our Trust might look like – what impact could we have together if everything we did was outstanding;
 agree the expectations we should have for ourselves and each other; and
 develop a shared plan for the next five years.

I recognise that we’ve not listened as well as we could have done in the past. That’s why we’re going to do it differently this time.

From 20 April, you are invited to an online conversation where we will ask you to re-imagine the future of our Trust. Together, we will agree the difference we want to make to the communities we serve.

Towards the end of May, we will invite you to another online conversation to support us with our plans and by July, we will have built in partnership a new vision for our Trust and agreed our values and our plan for the next five years. Your voice counts in our journey.

Please visit www.YourVoiceCounts.org.uk to get involved.

 

Ben Hannigan's blog

Technological failure meant I was unable to participate in this week’s Mental Elf campfire discussion, What has qualitative research ever done for us? The context for the event was the recent decision by the BMJ to reject a paper submitted for publication by members of the McGill Qualitative Research Group on the grounds that qualitative research reports are of low priority. This, the BMJ editors added, is because they are downloaded and cited less often than are reports of quantitative research. The BMJ communication conveying this news to the McGill team was posted on social media, triggering significant protest and then a letter to the BMJ making the case for qualitative methods and urging an editorial rethink.

These kinds of debates over the relative value of different research approaches flare up from time-to-time. Sixteen years ago Philip Burnard and I wrote a paper on the emergence of two camps within mental…

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Open Minded Online

sharing ideas and resources about holistic approaches to emotional and social wellbeing

Dr Sally Pezaro

This is the research blog of Dr Sally Pezaro. Sally is 'The Academic Midwife' working to secure excellence in teaching and maternity services. Specialist interests include maternity services, workforce and midwifery research.

The Mental Nurse

The inane ramblings of a mental health nursing student in the UK.

Academic Irregularities

Critical university studies, discourse and managerialism

donnajkemp

Sharing all things mental health nursing

The Academic Triangle

Teaching, Research and Admin

PhDanger

The evolving tale of my PhD as it happens

Blogs on Nursing

Nursing, Nursing politics, Leadership, anything.

gate: The General Assessment Tool

The General Assessment Tool

Graeme Cumming

Author, Speaker, Blogger

Patient Leader

My continuing journey as a Patient Leader

Mental Health Cop

A venn diagram of policing, mental health and criminal justice

Critical Mental Health Nurses' Network

Committed mental health nurses asking questions about mental health nursing

A Caring Mind

A blog for carers of mental health

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