A digital place for people who access services, carers, staff and partner agencies, to share ideas around care co-ordination & care planning in mental health

Posts tagged ‘wellbeing plan’

My Wellbeing and Recovery Plan

My Wellbeing and Recovery Plan

This is the new name for the CPA Care Plan as chosen by you (you can read more about Care Programme Approach here). It is due for launch on the 8th of June 2015 but what does this mean for people accessing services and for people working in mental health? Changing the name on the tin doesn’t mean the contents will taste any better, so here is an outline of what the new care plan is intended to bring (Ellie Apple is fictitious):

  • wellbeing report front pgA renewed focus on people’s wellbeing and recovery –  This is a shift away from focusing on ‘clinical recovery’; this is  about seeing people as individuals within their own life context. Supporting people to build satisfying, fulfilling and enjoyable lives  with  positive states of mind and body, feeling safe and able to cope, with a sense of connection with people, communities and the wider environment.
  •  Co-production – Service users, carer’s, supporters and care coordinators working together to develop the care plan. In days past, the care plan was a document that was written by the health care professional, filed in the persons notes and read by staff – the actual person it concerned often had no idea what was in it! The Wellbeing and Recovery Plan is intended to be developed with the person – even better if the person writes their own care plan.
  • wellbeing report pg2Working towards the persons goals – This sets a direction of travel with the destination defined by the person it concerns, not the service.  Getting to know a person is a good way to find out what the persons goals are; talking about goals and getting a clear understanding of them is a recovery tool in itself. The Wellbeing and Recovery Plan is a place to record the goals and the plan to work towards achieving them. People’s goals don’t stop when their time with mental health services ends, indeed, people will likely only be with mental health services when their needs are greatest. Linking in with local community based support networks –  family, supporters, voluntary organisations, volunteering, working, hobbies, interests etc can be vital to the person in reaching their goals and enjoying wellbeing and recovery.
  • People having a copy of their care plan – Having worked together to develop the goals, the care plan and the crisis plan, the person should receive a copy of their care plan. This seems straightforward but people have said that they don’t have a copy of their care plan, so what gets in the way of this? I have a few thoughts about this here but feel free to add your own views/comments…….. Care coordinators will now be required to record the date that they shared the care plan with the person – this may be face to face (ideal!) but might be posted out and I look forward to when care plans can be shared digitally……….

The changes are supported by the use of ‘plain English’; people are encouraged to write their own care plans; to say what’s important to them and to have open discussions about their care, support and treatment. Want to make a start at your own care plan? – you can find the template for it here.

As ever, your comments/views/opinions are welcomed……..

 

Information for people accessing services and carers about CPA


cpa-logo

Care Programme Approach (CPA) is the term used to describe the way that a person’s care, support and treatment is arranged when they have a range of needs.  This is done through assessment, coordination, care planning and review.  Some people will have straightforward needs; their care, support and treatment are described as ‘Standard Care Plan’.  You can read our policy: The Trust Wide Care Programme Approach Policy (including arrangements for Standard Care Plan) here.

Information for people accessing services and carers about CPA

1735_DSC_0245_scrabble_recoveryThe single most important thing about CPA is that you should be at the centre; it’s about you; it’s about what you want to do with your life; about what you want to achieve and how you want to achieve it. This may involve support, care and treatment from others – people that support you, carers, your friends, family, it may also include mental health services, health services, social care, and other organisations near where you live. Some people also get support from others going through similar difficulties – this is often called ‘Peer Support’. You can access peer support in a number of ways, for example, Mind, local groups or online support.

 

There are four stages to CPA:-

1. Assessment
You will be asked questions about aspects of your life and past, for example: personal; health; social;  about your safety (this is sometimes called risk); about what you enjoy doing; about what you do to help manage; about anyone else all ready involved in your care and support, including any carer. Carers can have their own assessment.

 2. Care Coordination

A care coordinator will be named to work closely with you and your carer to arrange care and support and to work with you to agree goals.
3. Care Plan
This describes your health and social care goals.  The care plan says which services will help with recovery and wellbeing; and what you do to help too.

The care plan is about you. It is developed with you and includes your goals; what support is being offered; who is giving the support and when the support will be reviewed.  The carer will be included too if you want this.

You may write the care plan yourself, or write it with your co-ordinator, either way, you should have a copy of your care plan.

4. Review
These are sometimes called CPA meetings; they happen at least every 12 months but can be more often. This is where the care plan is reviewed.  This is done by discussing with you, your carer (with agreement) and any others involved in your care plan about what is working well and what may need to be changed to support your recovery and wellbeing. The review is usually held in a way that you prefer – for example, some people prefer more of a relaxed discussion with their co-ordinator, others prefer a full meeting with everyone involved present.

Have you recently had a review? If so, let us know how this was for you by completing a brief survey (12 questions) – click here for more information and the survey. Results tell us what we are doing well and where we need to improve.


Standard Care Plan

If you have straightforward needs and are seen by one mental health worker then your care, support and treatment is described as ‘Standard Care Plan’.

You can expect:

  • A lead professional identified – this will be the person that you see
  • A letter – this is the care plan
  • Review – this is a chance to talk about how things are going and any further care plan agreed.

More written information

Click here for an information leaflet about CPA

Click here to read an information booklet on CPA – for people in Leeds

Click here to read an information booklet on CPA – for people in York and North York

These booklets are also available in Urdu, Farsi, Czech and Polish – contact donna.kemp@nhs.net for these.

Want to get involved and keep up to date about what’s going on?

blog title jpegThe LYPFT Planning Care Network is a digital space for people who access services, carers/supporters, staff and partner agencies to share their ideas and experiences around care coordination and care planning.  Click here to visit the network; you are most welcome to post comments and to share your views and experience. If you want to write your own blog post, then contact donna.kemp@nhs.net to discuss.

SUN logoYou can also join the Service User Network – they meet monthly in a range of venues across Leeds; click here for more information.

 

If you require any further information regarding CPA or Standard Care Plan then please contact donna.kemp@nhs.net

Meeting

You are invited to attend a meeting on the 20th November to hear more about the Planning Care Network.

There are 2 venues:

Sycamore Suite at Bootham Park Hospital, York 10.00 – 12.00

Becklin Centre Training Room 3, Leeds 14.00 – 16.00

It would be great to see you there, but if you can’t attend that’s ok; just check back here to see whats going on.

Donna

Tag Cloud

The Mental Nurse

The inane ramblings of a mental health nursing student in the UK.

Academic Irregularities

Critical university studies, discourse and managerialism

donnajkemp

Sharing all things mental health nursing, service user and carer involvement, care planning, Care Programme Approach, recovery and wellbeing

The Academic Triangle

Teaching, Research and Admin

PhDanger

The evolving tale of my PhD as it happens

gate: The General Assessment Tool

The General Assessment Tool

Graeme Cumming

Author, Speaker, Blogger

Patient Leader

My continuing journey as a Patient Leader

lypftstudents

Excellence in nursing and AHP education

The Academy of Fabulous Stuff

Sharing all the fabulous things about the NHS.

Mental Health Cop

A venn diagram of policing, mental health and criminal justice

Critical Mental Health Nurses' Network

Working together to reclaim mental health nursing

A Caring Mind

A blog for carers of mental health

Stuck on Social Work

And what a great place to be

NHS Improving Quality

Improving health outcomes by providing improvement and change expertise

%d bloggers like this: